BACHELOR OF INTERACTIVE MEDIA & DESIGN

At Bond University, 2017 – 2019

Please see below for information regarding the subjects involved in a Bachelor of Interactive Media and Design at Bond University.
The grades that have been awarded and where First In Class has been achieved is also documented. 
 
Cumulative Grade Point Average:  3.850 (out of 4)   / /   Cumulative Percentage Average: 89
Graduated in June 2019 as the Faculty of Society and Design’s Valedictorian (here’s my speech at the ceremony).
 
NOTE: All course descriptions have been obtained from the Bond University Website.

In this subject students will be introduced to critical thinking and clear expression. They will evaluate arguments, identify assumptions, judge patterns of inference, and recognise and apply various methods of reasoning. Students will learn how to clarify and visually represent their thinking to make better decisions, evaluate and use evidence, and communicate more effectively in their writing and speaking. Using these skills, students will structure and write an academic essay and deliver an oral presentation.

This subject is designed to help students develop the intrapersonal and interpersonal skills to function effectively as individual contributors, team players and leaders in diverse social contexts. These skills are essential to all students’ personal and professional lives in any current or future profession. Students will gain a greater understanding of their personality, values, emotions, perceptions and related attributes, and develop an appreciation of the diversity of these characteristics in others. This perspective is required to work effectively in diverse multi-disciplinary groups and to develop the followership and leadership behaviours that are highly valued in contemporary organisations. Finally, students will develop a structured, personal, self-directed approach to their ongoing learning and time management.

Using an applied case-based approach, this subject helps students gain ethical awareness, develop relevant reasoning skills, and empower themselves to act ethically in personal and professional contexts. This interdisciplinary subject explores critical ethical issues in science, law, business, media, and the environment. Topics remain flexible to reflect the dynamic nature of ethical issues in the 21st century.

This subject introduces students to the increasing and important role of design within a global and multidisciplinary context. Students will learn fundamental design principles and design elements such as colour, typography, line, shape and form as foundations for understanding of the aesthetic, functional and social applications of design. They will apply these principles, using industry standard software, such as Adobe Photoshop, to the process of design and effective communication in a digital environment.
 
* Advanced standing was acquired from previous studies undertaken at Swinburne University of Technology (the beginnings of a Bachelor of Design [Digital Media]).

Responsive Web Design introduces students to theoretical and practical application of recognised web design principles and global standards such as accessibility and useability. The subject applies these to planning, documentation, design and building of websites using industry standard software. Topics covered include web design principles; fundamental HTML semantic; CSS for styling of webpage layouts; useability; accessibility; building for web 2.0; social media on the web; basis of interaction design; documentation for website planning; website information structure, colour management, typography for the web and image file formats.

This subject introduces students to a critically important skillset for new media scholars and practitioners. Students will learn the primitive operations and control flow at the level of procedural rhetoric, aesthetics and poetics encoded in today’s highly visual and interactive digital media. Through the use of computational and visual methods students will explore the patterns and dynamics of algorithmic generated art, computer games and the richness of interactivity.​​​​​​​

This subject introduces students to the concepts needed for a career in 3D design. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of modelling, texturing and rendering techniques required to create digital 3D models and cutting edge visualisation pipelines like Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and 3D printing. Students will learn industry standard concepts used across a multitude of 3D development tools and produce their own high quality portfolio work.

This subject introduces changes to traditional media, new computer-based communication systems and revolutionary changes in telecommunications. New communication technologies are examined in their social context by drawing on studies in economics, psychology, sociology, business and other social sciences and humanities disciplines. Digitisation, convergence and technological determinism are explored.

Emerging media promote interactivity both real and simulated. New media organisations and new positions in old media organsisations are being created to take advantage of these new media. This advanced subject surveys the concepts, technologies and applications of interactivity for new media. These include interactive television, books, games, music, and the wired and wireless web. This subject has applications for advertising, film and television, jounalism, public relations and corporate communication students.

Interactive Media Design Studio 1 is one of three studio-based subjects included in the Bachelor of Interactive Media and Design. The objective is to hone students’ practical design skills in art, programming or design toward the development of an industry standard professional digital portfolio. Students have the choice of working on a client project, a creative piece, a game, website or other interactive media project using hardware and software they’ve learnt in other classes or to broaden their skill base through working with other industry tools.

Interactive Media Design Studio 2 is one of three studio-based subjects included in the Bachelor of Interactive Media and Design. The objective is to hone students’ practical design skills in art, programming or design toward the development of an industry standard professional digital portfolio. Students have the choice of working on a client project, a creative piece, a game, website or other interactive media project using hardware and software they’ve learnt in other classes or to broaden their skill base through working with other industry tools.

Interactive Media Design Studio 3 is one of three studio-based subjects included in the Bachelor of Interactive Media and Design. The objective is to hone students’ practical design skills in art, programming or design toward the development of an industry standard professional digital portfolio. Students have the choice of working on a client project, a creative piece, a game, website or other interactive media project using hardware and software they’ve learnt in other classes or to broaden their skill base through working with other industry tools.

Digital Media Design explores the diverse nature of digital interactive media by further developing the fundamental skills and knowledge taught in MMDE11-100 Design Communications. The subject unifies the diverse nature of interactive media by combining advanced design thinking and digital media design skills with industry standard software such as Adobe InDesign. Topics covered will help prepare students for the diverse digital expectations of a 21st Century global marketplace and include interface design, icon design and responsive media design.

Interactive Web Design builds on the foundation knowledge and skills taught in MMDE11-200 Responsive Web Design. The subject focus is on the dynamic behaviour of Web Design combined with an exploration of client-side interaction and Web Applications. The knowledge and skills covered in the subject prepare students in meeting the current and future expectations of a changing global marketplace. Students will further their knowledge and skills in the fundamentals of HTML and CSS while exploring dynamic behaviours in client user experience, user interaction, web animation, JavaScript and commonly used front-end libraries and frameworks.

The purpose of the subject is to introduce students to the concepts used in combining multimedia components: 2D images, 3D modelling and animation, video, audio and interface design. It is expected that the principles learned in MMDE12-250will be applied to the students’ work and expanded upon to create rich multimedia productions.
 
* Advanced standing was acquired from previous studies undertaken at Swinburne University of Technology (the beginnings of a Bachelor of Design [Digital Media]).

This subject will provide students with the basic competencies required to capture and manipulate sound for radio and video production, to identify and use professionally different types of microphones, to use a range of digital recording devices, to understand room dynamics and requirements for recording and to work with sound on the AVID and Protools platforms. This is a practical course with a theoretical foundation which will give you a more professional approach to audio in future subsequent course work.

This subject comprises the theory and practice of editing with a particular emphasis on matching image and sound with emotional tone. Students receive instruction on a range of digital editing equipment in small group and individual settings.
 
* Advanced standing was acquired from previous studies undertaken at Swinburne University of Technology (the beginnings of a Bachelor of Design [Digital Media]).

An internship subject involves a supervised project or workplace experience utilising knowledge and skills gained in previously completed computer game studies courses. The internship provides an opening into the industry or government sector and an introduction to the imperatives in play for workers who develop expertise in the field.

The composition and size of the computer game industry is undergoing rapid change. This subject will outline the relationship between developers, distributors, retailers and regulators both globally and in Australia. Issues such as trade practices, copyright and IP are examined. Case studies of major computer game-related companies, organisations and regulatory bodies including current market data provide students with a contemporary overview of the industry. On completion of this class, successful students will have a high level of knowledge necessary to work in the interactive entertainment industry.

This subject introduces students to the fundamental principles of computer game design and development.  Throughout the course, students will learn the basics of programming, 2D interface design, game physics, artificial intelligence techniques and game world creation.  This theory will be applied in the design and development of a 3D computer game created with industry standard software.

This course explores the changing and varied nature of computer game audiences and the culture that they inhabit and which surrounds them. Drawing on both, contemporary social sciences and cultural studies research the course attempts to map the complex relationships between computer games, gamers, popular culture and wider society. Distinctions between various types of audiences are discussed: social gamers, casual gamers, hard-core gamers, as are the various player structures of computer games and their ludic significance. Special attention is paid to online interaction and MMOGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Games), examining the active social networks surrounding such games as Everquest and World of Warcraft.

Video games have rapidly become not only one of the most significant forms of contemporary popular culture but also a chief form of creative expression. This subject introduces students to the broad spectrum and fundamental characteristics of videogames as art via critical analysis of form, style, narrative & genre. Videogame aesthetics are understood within their historical, technical and gameplay contexts.

This subject introduces students to mobile game design through a practical hands-on approach in which students are lead through all phases of game creation from design to deployment. Beginning with a mobile game brief, students will participate in problem-based action learning experiences designed to engage them in the complete life-cycle of mobile application development. From a very simple mobile game including a 2D scene and a 3D scene, as students are exposed to new topics over the weeks, they will be required to design a new aspect of functionality or game play and integrate it into their application. During the course of the subject students will cover mobile game development topics relating to the design and technical considerations, game engines, networking, business models, testing and deployment. Each theoretical element will be accompanied by an extensive team-based weekly workshop in a computing laboratory designed to provide students with practical skills.

A distinctive feature of contemporary life is mobile, wearable and ubiquitous computing devices with their strongly interactive character that have become an integral part of our lives. These devices have a diversity of interfaces and functions that we use in our personal, social and public life. Fundamental knowledge and skills in not only the use of new technology but also the seamless integration of it with people’s current devices and lifestyles is essential for interactive media and games design students. This subject will deliver an agile curriculum designed to accommodate the fast pace of changing technology and embed independent learning principles to allow students to critically evaluate new technologies as they become available and incorporate them throughout their vocations.